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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 9, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. record waiting times at a&e departments in english hospitals, according to figures seen by the bbc. emergency departments suffered their worst performance last month, since the target to see patients within four hours was brought in 13 years ago. good morning. it's thursday, the 9th of february. also this morning: the ayes to the right, 494, the left, 122. as theresa may gets the all—clear to trigger article 50, the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will be here to tell us what he wants to see
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from the brexit negotiations. how a new law to tackle rogue landlords is failing to protect tenants from so—called "revenge evictions." good morning. should you be able to access your late partner's pension if you weren't married? a landmark ruling says "yes," paving the way to more pension freedoms. and it could affect millions of workers. i'll look at the details. leicester have their first home win of the year. demarai gray scores in extra time to help them beat derby in their fa cup fourth—round replay. you said you went home and you kissed your boy, you hugged your boy. weren't you doing that before? i've been talking fatherhood, fake news, and the changing face of us politics, with denzel washington. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold day you had. the best of the sunshine in the west. central and eastern areas, more cloud, some showers, and quite windy for some as well. all the details in about 30 minutes. thank
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you, carol. see you soon. good morning. first, our main story. accident and emergency departments in england last month had their worst waiting time performance since had their worst waiting targets were introduced. that's according to provisional figures leaked to the bbc. the data also suggests that record numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed to become available. with more here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. for months, a&e departments across england have been struggling. we we re england have been struggling. we were given access to the raw royal blackburn hospital. the difficulty was easy to see. it is a similar picture across england. provisional figures appeared to show that last month, 82% of patients were treated, admitted, and discharged within four hours, the worst performance since
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the target of 95% was produced in 2004. 780 the target of 95% was produced in 200a. 780 patients waited more than 12 hours for a bed after being admitted to hospital, known as a trolley wait, again the worst on record. if the figures are correct, it shows the degree of pressure the nhs is under, despite huge efforts from 1.4 million staff. the nhs is really struggling to cope with extra demand, record levels of demand. these figures are the worst since the four hour a&e target was introduced. it shows the pressure. the nhs in scotland is coping better. but similar issues affect wales and northern ireland. symptoms of the pressure building across health and social care. nhs sources acknowledged the system is facing
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unprecedented demand. the latest figures suggest there is little sign of respite. dominic hughes, bbc news. we'll be speaking to the president of the royal college of emergency medicine about the figures just after 7am this morning. the government has told the house of lords not to block brexit after mps overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger article 50, with a majority of four to one. the brexit secretary, david davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty" and pass the legislation. more than 50 labour mps defied the three—line whip imposed by their leader, jeremy corbyn, and voted against the bill. here's our political correspondent, tom bateman. the message was clear. mps gave their overwhelming support for theresa may's plan to get on with brexit talks. it is an historic vote today. it got through with a large majority. it has carried out the
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will of the british people. that is what parliament has done today. just 137 words long, the bill, very simple, telling us we have to do what the people wanted. some people for the bill all the way. they lost, but they sung the european anthem in defiance. the threat of a conservative rebellion fell away, but 52 labour mps, including clive lewis, a shadow cabinet minister, defined jeremy corbyn to vote against the bill. —— defied. defined jeremy corbyn to vote against the bill. -- defied. what you have done is allow a stitch up on the 21st century equivalent of a c011 on the 21st century equivalent of a conjob. on the 21st century equivalent of a con job. theresa may left after the
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vote clearing a first hurdle in parliament. now the bill goes to the £5 lords, where it may need house of lords, where it may need yet more opposition. tom bateman, bbc news, westminster. and picking up on that house of lords process, our political correspondent, carol walker, is in westminster this morning. we move onto the next step. talk us through what will happen. there will bea through what will happen. there will be a huge amount of pressure on gears to let this bill goes through and complete its passage through parliament swiftly. —— peers. downing street sources have made it clear if the lord's tried to disrupt this process they could face calls to be abolished. now, i don't think that will stop peers from putting down amendments, the government does not have a majority, but any delays and changes will be minor and they will be able to see that off and stick to their timetable for triggering article 50 by the end of march. the biggest immediate problem is facing the labour leaderjeremy
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corbyn. he has four positions in his shadow cabinet to feel and must decide whether to take action against more than a dozen junior mps who voted against the bill and his wishes. that has laid bare the huge divisions within the labour party. carol, thank you. just after 8am, we'll be discussing this with labour leader, jeremy corbyn. a new law designed to help protect people in england from so—called "revenge evictions" by rogue landlords isn't working, according to senior mps and housing lawyers. a bbc freedom of information request has revealed that there may be hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants, afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted. this report from daniel whitworth. things like damp faulty electrics and broken boilers can all badly affect people's health. hello? but here in leeds, there's a concern many are too scared to complain in case their landlord kicks them out. this is rented out as private
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rented accommodation, people are living here. people are paying to rent here, making complaints, nothing happening and they could be under the threat of revenge eviction. that's the reason why they're not coming forward to the council to complain. and that's exactly what happened to helen. her and herfamily were hit with a revenge eviction. it was horrible. after months of complaining, we got a firm of solicitors in who deal with properties in these states of disrepair. they checked the property and they agreed it was damp and something needed to be done. so they wrote to our landlord and instructed that work needed to be done on the property. and within a week of him receiving that, we received a section 21 eviction notice pushed under our door. because of what happened to people like helen, a new law was introduced in october 2015 to try to stop retaliatory or so—called "revenge evictions." but we've seen exclusive figures gathered in a freedom of information request gathered from hundreds
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of councils right across england that show more than half haven't stopped any at all. more than a quarter don't even record figures and fewer than one in five have taken any action. the government says "revenge evictions" are rare, and thanks to its new law, councils have all the powers they need to stop them. dan whitworth, bbc news. the labour peer who campaigned for unaccompanied migrant children to come to the uk, has said the government's decision to stop the programme is shameful. when the dubs scheme was introduced last year, campaigners hoped thousands of children would benefit, but the actual numbers have been much lower. alexandra mackenzie reports. vulnerable and scared. many children remain in camps across europe. an estimated 90,000 all alone without family. following intense pressure last year, the then prime minister david cameron introduced a programme
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to give century to some. campaigners had hoped 3000 unaccompanied children with no links to the uk would benefit. instead, 350 will be taken in before this scheme ends next month. it was designed by lord dubs, a former refugee who fled from the nazis himself. i was in greece. desperate conditions. many unaccompanied children who are bitterly cold and miserable we need to help them. there has been widespread condemnation. 0pposition parties have called the move a betrayal of vulnerable children and british values, and called on the government to revive the dubs ammendment. some were taken to this place in devon. the home office says it isa place in devon. the home office says it is a matter of resources, the balance between enabling children to
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enter the country, while ensuring that local councils have the capacity to look after them. alexander mackenzie, bbc news. the us senate has approved president trump's choice of attorney general, jeff sessions. mr trump criticised efforts by democrats to block the appointment. mr sessions was denied a post as a federaljudge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied the allegations. tributes have continued to be paid to tara palmer—tomkinson after her shock death, aged just 45. the actress and model became an "it—girl" in the 90s and wrote about her life as an aristocrat and her close ties to the royal family. she was found dead in her london home after revealing that she had a brain tumour in november last year. jane austin's mr darcy from pride and prejudice is one of the most admired and romantic leading men in literary history. when colin firth played him he was famously tall, dark and handsome, but that might not have been the case according to new research. this portrait by british academics paints a very different picture of mr darcy, giving him a pale face, powdered white hair, a long nose and a pointy chin. he's a far cry from the brooding
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mr darcy created by filmmakers. yes. umm there you go. you can see the contrast. laughing. what did they say, a powdered... a powdered face. what is wrong with a powdered face? and fair hair. no tan because you are always inside. he looked a little bit like you. why are you doing that are you thinking hmm? what have you got going on was —— on? leicester have theirfirst home win of the year. they are one point above the relegation zone in the premier league. but the champions beat derby county
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3—1 in their fa cup fourth round replay. demari gray scoring the pick of the goals. mps will debate the football association's failure to reform later today. it follows a motion of "no confidence" in the governing body. parliament will examine whether the fa can "comply fully with its duties." hundreds of mourners gathered in wolverhampton yesterday for the funeral of former england women's cricket captain, rachael heyhoe flint. a pioneer in women's cricket, she died aged 77 last month after a short illness. british snowsports are aiming to become one of the world's top five skiing and snowboarding nations by 2030. the winter olympics take place in pyeongchang south korea in one year and uk sport says great britain can achieve its best ever winter games. that is quite a long time to wait for your target, 2030. why have they
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become so good at winter sports at the moment? used to have to on a dry ski slope. there are many more with new indoor ones. and there is snow on the mountains by carol. is that the grampians? this is a librarian picture. i knew you were going to ask me where it was. sorry. may be some malay like yorkshire. —— somewhere like. calls are today and cloudy across central and eastern areas. we will see showers, rain, sleet and snow. a blocking area of high pressure in the continent with wind moving around that coming from a cold sauce is sweeping across our shores so it is sweeping across our shores so it isa is sweeping across our shores so it is a cold start. in western scotland you will see some sunshine this morning but it is cold and frosty. down the east coast where we have
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the wintry showers, the risk of ice. a sunny start across north—west england, but a cold one and as we come down the east coast and inland we are looking on the coast at a mixture of rain and sleet. inland it isa mixture of rain and sleet. inland it is a mixture of sleet and snow. showers across the south, not as cold but still cold and as we drift towards the south—west you are under clearer skies but not as cold. four degrees, will not feel warm if you are stepping outside. more cloud as we push inland and for northern ireland a bit more cloud as well stop temperatures at 7am right about four degrees in belfast. through the course of the day the lion's share of the sunshine will be out of the west, where it will be windy. gales in the west, they will ease a touch during the day but a cold wind lowing in those showers. coming out the cloud in central and eastern areas. because they are showers not all of us will see one but they will have a wintry element to them inland. through the evening and
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overnight it will be windy. we will have some showers strolling along the south of england here and there will be wintry across the grampians, the pennines and the east of the country as well. it is a cold night, and where the skies remain clear across north—west scotland we are looking at a frost but frost shouldn't be a problem for much of the uk. that leaves us into tomorrow. tomorrow once again we are looking at some snow showers, again coming in from the east. 0n the coast, rain, sleet and snow as we push inland. not all of us will see them but across 0rkney and shetland we could see as much as five or six centimetres, just over two inches. those are the kind of temperature values but if you are in the wind it will feel colder than those temperatures are suggesting. as we head on into saturday we have a similar combination of rain and sleet in the coast, snow showers as we push inland. the change of wind direction to the north—easterly, still feeling cold but some of the showers will blow over to the west
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so we will see some in wales, the south—west of england and northern ireland, and a quick look at sunday. asimilar kind ireland, and a quick look at sunday. a similar kind of story, still some snow showers around and it will feel raw if you are out in that wind. snow showers around and it will feel raw if you are out in that windm is going to feel raw. it is going to feel roar! shall we have a look at the papers? as many of the papers are this morning, the front page dominated by the vote last night. worth pointing out thatjeremy corbyn will be with us on the sofa just after 8am, many questions of course posed about his leadership or what he makes of what will happen in the brexit negotiations. the daily express also talking about that vote, saying that mps last night gave theresa may the all clear to ta ke gave theresa may the all clear to take britain out of the eu, and prince charles with tara parker
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thompson, who tragically died. the front page of the times has some big brands and where the advertising ends up. and if you go inside, it explains a little bit about how it works and it is not the brands themselves who are choosing to advertise on the extremist videos but we don't all see the same advert only click on a video. the video player will look at what else we have been browsing for on the internet, it will find relevant ad and may be sure you one for a car, bank or retailer. that is how they are ending up on these sites. google, which owns youtube, has received is in place to stop it happening but some are clearly getting through. on the front page of the daily express a follow on with eu exit, time to get on with it, a theme from many of the papers this morning. and the guardian this morning also with a picture of tara palmer—tomkinson, and the story of anger and dismay greeting the announcement by the government that
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it will end its commitment to provide a lone child refugees in europe. i know lots of people are enjoying the rugby at the moment, you included, charlie. the mirror have done a piece about eddiejones who has been compared to brian clough, because the thing about eddiejones is clough, because the thing about eddie jones is he clough, because the thing about eddiejones is he has got that air of confidence. he exudes confidence the whole time and lows on into his players. he is quite clever at manipulating us, journalists. he has said his players are scared of playing wales at home. not all of them are scared of playing wales at home, but it is the clever thing to say. he has said privately that he knows journalists want the headline and if you don't give them something to talk about they will talk about something else. he is deciding what they are going to talk about and giving them a new thing to say each day which keeps all of us distract that while he gets on with it. they
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are all into the idea of mind games, they? in the game on saturday is at they? in the game on saturday is at the millennium stadium. if i am remembering rightly i think the visiting team can request the roof to be close. he said so far they haven't decided whether they are going to request for the roof to be closed, they will wait and see. the big thing about closing the roof is it could give wales an advantage, it makes it much noisier. it locks in the atmosphere. if you are there on the atmosphere. if you are there on the roof is closed, the atmosphere is unbelievable. this is a story we will cover letter in the programme, that body shop could be looking for a new owner. we can think of it as a touchy—feely local retailer but it is owned by loreal, and it has been struggling on the high street. sales have fallen, down about .5%. —— l'0real. we will talk about that just about eight a.m.. and this is
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about people who when they go home ofan about people who when they go home of an evening might feel a bit lonely, and now injapan they have come up with a virtual grandmother who you can put on your tv who will chat to you while you are having your tea. you can interact with the granny. this old lady chats on the screen and creates the illusion of a family meal while you are at home. does she tell you off and tell you you are doing everything wrong? she is critical of your cooking! it is a real person? there is this lady, who is the one who is being filmed, and it is connected to your smartphone and everything so you can interact and everything so you can interact and basically have a bit of company. it makes you feel better, that is all that matters, isn't it? she asked you if you slept well. quite sweet, really, isn't it? across the bbc this week, we have been looking at the pressures the nhs is under.
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we have met rural gps working long hours, seen how cuts are affecting mental health provision, and investigated alternative ways to fund the service. today, for our nhs health check, we follow a day in the life of kathryn carruthers, a matron at a busy emergency care unit in north london. it is chock—a—block. all those patients you can see are waiting and there is probably more patients, more patients here and more patients all down the corridor here. everybody is trying but sometimes trying isn't enough, and you feel that everything is gridlocked. and that everything is gridlocked. and that can be very frustrating. my name is kathryn carruthers. i'm the matron for emergency care here at this hospital. where part of the emergency division. we try to see patients that need urgent care, and get treatment without the
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requirement for admission. a&e have already run this morning to see if we can take some patients that have been down there for quite sometime. we're at 100%. staffing is a huge challenge. we don't always have the number of staff that we would like. 0k, number of staff that we would like. ok, so will go to ed. it is busy. lots of staff and patients and trolleys and relatives, who looks set up. they have been waiting, you can tell. good morning. i cathy, i'm the matron. i know you have been here for a very long time. for me, currently, this is probably the worst i have seen the nhs. when it is completely relentless, i think you do drain staff. got a real problem, actually. there is a woman who hasjust moved, and she has a
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bowel instruction, and she can sit here all night in a chair. it is absolutely full, and nowhere to examine patients. which is not the hospital's fault, it does its absolute best. mayhem and bad. sorry, do you mind if! absolute best. mayhem and bad. sorry, do you mind if i take this call? high:. two orthopaedic patients, a chap in a chair. —— hi, colin. i had to wait, and wait and wait. 0h colin. i had to wait, and wait and wait. oh well. looks like a movie now. you are not allergic to any medicine? it is almost the end of the day. my department ticked along quite nicely. i don't think it is sustainable to continue this amount of pressure. i am off training, i metan of pressure. i am off training, i met an athletic club before going home and seeing to the rest of the family. and then back to do it all again. back to do it all again
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tomorrow. thank you to kathryn carruthers and her staff at northwick ealing hospital. you can find out much more about the bbc‘s nhs health check series online, including a piece by our health correspondent nick triggle, who has analysed ten charts which show why, despite rising funding, the nhs is in trouble. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: denise brewster was with her partner for ten years, but after he died, she was told she couldn't receive his pension because they weren't married. we will speak to a legal expert about how a supreme court ruling in herfavour could now affect millions of unmarried couples. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. police are looking for the person responsible for posting racist
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and antisemitic stickers on the london underground. british transport police have released this image, after stickers with nazi terminology and swastikas were found at piccadilly circus and covent garden. they are asking the public for help to trace the man, and say all instances of hate crime are taken extremely seriously. a new centre to support victims of female genital mutilation will open in reading. teams of health and law experts will work with communities where fgm is more common, which organisers say is the first of its kind. three years ago the department for health declared reading one of 11 hotspots for fgm. i was at an age of about four or five years old when my grandparents started speaking to me about being cut. she feels like i am the one who sort of, you know, sort of discouraged her from sort of, you know, sort of discouraged herfrom letting this
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happen, because she says that her life has been ruined as a result of me not getting cut. an nhs nurse who died after he set himself alight outside kensington palace killed himself while his mind was disturbed, according to a coroner. an inquest into amin abdullah‘s death heard he died in february last year, after losing hisjob at charing cross hospital. the coroner said he had been suffering from depression following a disciplinary matter at work. the 41—year—old died from burns and the inhalation of fire and fumes. let's have a look at the travel situation now. first the tubes: the district line has some minor delays between earls court and wimbledon, because of late finishing engineering work. but it looks like all other lines are ok at the moment. 0n the roads, this is blackwall lane. you can see the usual traffic around this time for those travelling northbound on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. and in westminster, great george street remains closed eastbound from birdcage walk to parliament square for cycle highway works. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. yesterday it was cloudy and cold. today we are
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going to be keeping all of that the, low cloud and it is going to feel even colder. we might even see a few wintry flurries here and there, particular you towards east. now, to start this morning with temperatures hovering around the freezing mark. not too much on the way of frost, though, because the so dry. we've got a very raw, easterly wind that is going to be blowing in a few showers at times. most of the showers at times. most of the showers are going to fall as drizzle, not amounting to very much at all, but you might see that is going to be blowing in a few showers at times. most of the showers are going to fall as drizzle, not amounting to very much at all, but you might see a bit wintry flurries here and there, tending to be lighter nature, but watch out for a little bit of ice on services tomorrow morning, temperatures hovering around the freezing mark. tomorrow could be the coldest day of the next few. again, it is going to feel very raw with that easterly wind. a few light, wintry flurries here and there, not really amounting
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to very much at all, though, and that risk will continue over the course of the weekend. the weekend, plenty of cloud around. it will start to get a bit less cold as we head into the start of next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. jeremy corbyn says the "real fight starts now," after mps overwhelming voted to back brexit. we'll be asking him what he wants to see from the negotiations just after 8am. new rules on child booster seats are on the way. but there's still confusion over who should be sitting in what. we'll try and get to the bottom of the new regulations for you in the next hour. let me ask you a question. i am the journalist now. and hollywood superstar, denzel washington, turned the tables and started interviewing charlie when they met to discuss his new film
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"fences" this week. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. accident and emergency departments in england last month suffered their worst waiting time performance since targets were introduced, according to provisional data leaked to the bbc. the figures also suggest that record numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed to become available. the department of health insists the vast majority of patients were treated quickly. we'll be speaking to the president of the royal college of emergency medicine about the figures just after 7am. the government has told the house of lords not to block brexit, after mps overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger article 50, with a majority of four to one. the brexit secretary, david davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty" and pass the legislation. more than 50 labour mps defied the three—line whip imposed by their leader, jeremy corbyn, and voted against the bill. 0ur political correspondent, carol walker, is in westminster this morning. carol, how much pressure will there be on the lords not to force any changes to this?
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brexit now moves on to the lords. talk us through it. there is huge pressure on the house of lords to ta ke pressure on the house of lords to take heed of that. they will look at the authority the government had at the authority the government had at the end of the vote last night. downing street sources have said if the lord's tried to disrupt or change the process, they could call for the abolition. i think there will be a huge amount of pressure on peers to toe the line now. that will not stop amendments being put down and attempts to change the ruling. but ministers are confident they will get the bill through both chambers of parliament in time to begin the formal brexit negotiations by the end of march. the biggest immediate problem is the one facing the labour leaderjeremy corbyn. he has four positions to fill in his
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shadow cabinet after the resignation of clive lewis. he is deciding on the action to take on junior ministers who voted against the bill. although his spokesman has dismissed rumours he may be thinking of standing down in the future, i think it is a big problem for the labour party when it has divisions laid bare on such an important issue. carol, for the moment, thank you. a new law designed to help protect people in england from so—called "revenge evictions" by rogue landlords isn't working, according to senior mps and housing lawyers. a bbc freedom of information request has revealed that there may be hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants, afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted. the labour peer who campaigned for unaccompanied migrant children to come to the uk, has said the government's decision to stop the programme is shameful. when the dubs scheme was introduced last year, campaigners hoped thousands of children would benefit, but the actual numbers
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have been much lower. by by the time the system closes next month, 350 children will have been taken in. it was designed by lord dubs, a former refugee who fled nazi occupation is. i was in greece a few months ago. there were desperate situations, with many children cold and miserable. we owe it to those children. the government ministers said to me we intend to accept the letter and spirit of your amendment. my letter and spirit of your amendment. my contention is that they are not doing that. tributes have continued to be paid to tara palmer—tomkinson after her shock death, aged just 45. the actress and model became an "it—girl" in the 90s and wrote about her life as an aristocrat and her close ties to the royal family. she was found dead in her london home after revealing that she had a brain tumour in november last year. the us senate has approved president trump's choice of attorney general, jeff sessions. mr trump criticised
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efforts by democrats to block the appointment. mr sessions was denied a post as a federaljudge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied the allegations. good news for leicester. they needed. it has to be a consolation prize for them. -- need it. struggling premier league champions, leicester city, are through to the fifth round of the fa cup following a replay against derby county. they came through 3—1 after extra time. andy king put leicester ahead before abdoul camera's deflected free kick forced extra time. leicester restored their lead through substitute, wilfred ndidi, his first goal for the club. and demarai gray's superb solo goal secured their place in the fifth round. leicester now play millwall away. we wa nt
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we want to do well in the competition where we play. of course we wa nt competition where we play. of course we want to go forward in the fa cup. the premier league is not so good, but we have to play in the premier league. and then there is sunday. tonight was about the squad and the injured players getting back in the game we missed the opportunity in the first game. we did not want a replay. it was a fantastic game. fantastic support from our fans. and i could not fault the players.|j think i could not fault the players.” think he was slightly cross. mps will debate the football associations "failure to reform" later today. it follows a motion of no confidence in the governing body. parliament will examine whether the fa is fit for purpose. lastjuly, sports minister, tracey crouch, said the governing body would lose its £30 million to £40 million of public funding if it did not reform. britain is aiming to become one of the world's top five skiing and snowboarding nations by 2030.
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in a year's time, the winter 0lympics take place in pyeongchang, south korea, and uk sport says great britain can achieve its best ever games. at around 8:40, we'll be talking to olympic bronze medal winning snowboarder, jennyjones, and teamgb hopeful freestyle skier, rowan cheshire. a little bit more skiing coming up injusta a little bit more skiing coming up injust a moment. world champion, mark selby, suffered a shock first—round defeat to world number 18, martin gould, at snooker‘s world grand prix in preston yesterday. better news for australia's neil robertson. he compiled a century break in the first frame of his match with ricky walden. he won 4—2. he'll face ronnie 0'sullivan in the next round. i mentioned skiing, didn't i? you have to feel for this chap. no matter how much preparation and training you can put into a sport, nothing ever prepares you for this. could this be the worst start
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to a men's super—g ski race? here we go. so far, so good. but then, kazakhstan skier, taras pimenov, tripped as he left the gate at the skiing world championships at st moritz. that is awful. can we try and see it ain? that is awful. can we try and see it again? he finished 20 seconds behind the winner. the key word is that he finished. he got up and carried on? he got back up. he was not last! isn't that just a lesson? he got back up. he was not last! isn't thatjust a lesson? things can go wrong and you can just carry on. we will have that. we will see you later on. thank you. there's still a long way to go before brexit, but last night the message from mps was clear, let the government begin the uk's departure from the european union. 494 members voted in favour of the eu withdrawal bill, and 122 against. one of those to support it was the conservative mp james cleverly, who joins us
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now from westminster. good morning. so, the bill has passed unamended in the house of commons. it now goes to the lord's. do you think it will be passed there as well? i am pretty confident it will for two reasons. the fact it came from the commons unamended, what we call a clean bill, is a strong signal to the lord's. and the labour lord's, a deciding factor, they will want to put their own, they will want to put their own, they will want to put their own, they will not want to put their own party under any more pressure. anytime there is a brexit bill inputs their party under more pressure. you don't think there will be more amendments. but there could be, and if there are, what will happen? there is always a chance. there is always a chance the labour party will opt to a amended. the lib dems said they intend to make
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trouble. it puts the lords in a difficult position. people will be understandably frustrated and probably furious if the result of a democratic process is undermined by pa rt democratic process is undermined by part of the houses of parliament not up part of the houses of parliament not upfor part of the houses of parliament not up for election themselves. that will go down poorly with british people. sources from downing street suggest that if big you not pass this bill, it could mean that the lord's will be abolished. —— they do not. is that true? i have not heard that from my colleagues in downing street personally, but i do think that when the british people voted in huge numbers, the largest popular mandate in british political history, for the lord's to try and undermine or subvert that, that puts
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them ina undermine or subvert that, that puts them in a constitutionally very difficult place. it is a pragmatic place. many people understand the implications of trying to distort or delay or even undermine this bill... sorry to interrupt. you talk a lot, james cleverly, about a huge number of people voting to leave. many people voted to remain as well. yeah, absolutely. but the referendum result was conclusive. no one has questioned that referendum result. and i think that all the people who spoke before the referendum about the importance of honouring the result now have to do that. and i think they will. i think they will. there will be eu nationals living here that will be worried about their status in the country at the moment, won't there?” their status in the country at the moment, won't there? i am pleased the prime minister has made it clear
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and unambiguous statement with her desire to protect their status. if the eu matched her commitment word for word this will be resolved overnight. but they have said that they refused to discuss this until article 50 is triggered. so the sooner we can get article 50 is triggered. so the sooner we can get that drew the lords, the quicker we can give the security that the eu nationals living in the uk absolutely desire and absolutely deserve. —— through. what are your thoughts on parliament getting a say on the final deal, because there are some conservatives that want more than the take it or leave it vote being offered. you have to remember how parliament works. parliament works on a yes—no system. ultimately, the vote will be the proposed bill that has been negotiated over two years in 2019. and because we have to vote on a yes—no question, the question will
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have to be, yes, we accept this agreement, or, no, we do not accept that. you cannot have two versions of reality. that was always the case. that is how all parliament questions are structured. they could beissues questions are structured. they could be issues with the uk and eu negotiators to come up with a sensible pragmatic deal that works with us and our friends on the continent. and i hope that is what happens. ok, james cleverly, thank you very much for your time this morning. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: leaked figures show the performance of a&e units in england last month was the worst for 13 years. the government warns the house of lords not to stand in the way of brexit, after mps vote overwhelmingly in favour of starting the process. that is what we were just talking about. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning. earlier,
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i was asked where my picture was from. it was the lake district. it will be fairly cloudy in central and eastern areas with wintry showers. not all of us will see them, but some of us will. look at this area of high pressure. it is a blocking high blocking this frontal system coming our way. but around that, we are dragging in the cool airfrom the continent. if you have not gone outside, it will be cold and get colder. western scotland, watch out for frost. sunshine. wintry colder. western scotland, watch out forfrost. sunshine. wintry showers means highs on untreated surfaces in eastern scotland and england is possible. as we come across central and eastern parts, this is where we have more cloud in some wintry showers. 0n the coast, accommodation of rain and sleet, england, sleet and rain. inland towards the south—west, we are looking at some
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sunny skies. not quite as cold. but, if you are out here, it will not feel warm. sunshine for wales. cloudy in northern ireland. just a few showers. through the day we continue with the rain and sleet across the east coast. inland, a culmination of sleet and snow that could fall almost anywhere in central and eastern parts. sunshine out towards the west. it is going to bea out towards the west. it is going to be a windy day. windy in the morning towards the south—west. gales. that will go down through the day. one or two centimetres of snow in the pennines, the grampians, through the day. through the evening and overnight, where we have clear skies, you will see a frost. you might have to scrape the car in the morning. elsewhere, no issues with that. it will be cold. a lot of cloud around. still snow showers. highs may be a problem first thing in the morning to watch out for. —— ice. more of the same. tomorrow,
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shetland, more substantial snow. between 5—6 1010 metres, over two inches. cloud in central and eastern areas. rain, sleet and snow. brightest skies towards the west. windy. although the thermometer might say three or four, it will feel colder than that. saturday, the wind goes northerly, a cold direction for us. saturday, the snow showers will go over towards wales, the south—west of england, and also northern ireland. showers. not all of us will see them. maximum temperatures, four or five, but feeling colder than that. the wind will exacerbate that chilly feel. sunday, it will feel raw. we still have a north—easterly and easterly wind coming in off the continent. still quite a bit of cloud around in central and eastern parts as well. still that cloud is producing wintry
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showers. as is the drill for the next few days, down the east coast, rain and sleet moving inland. the combination is sleet and snow. temperatures, five to about seven. so, steph and charlie, a short you wrap up warmly. certainly. i love the way it, when you were talking about the cold, you did a little body shake with it. thank you very much, see you in a bit. a landmark ruling at the supreme court yesterday could pave the way to more pension freedoms for millions of people. ben is looking at what it could mean. this is the difference between a married couple and people who are partners, in relation to your pension. and it could come down to ticking a box on the form when you sign it. what rights do you have
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to your partner's pension if they die? well, if you were married, it is pretty straightforward. you automatically get access to it. but if you are not married, things aren't so clear. you are not automatically entitled to claim their pension savings. denise brewster lost her partner of more than ten years, but they weren't married, and she wasn't allowed to access the money he had saved. she thought that wasn't fair, and after an eight—year legal battle, she won. the initialfight the initial fight was about fighting for us, and what we were to each other. and then i realise that this wasn't only affecting me. this was affecting so many other families out there. so at least ijust had to defend myself and take my hardships, but when you have other families, that have a young daughter, losing their daddy of them army, and then they have their financial burden on top of that, the inequality and injustice of it all, i thought, was
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immense —— their mummy. with me is charmianjohnson from the legal firm eversheds sutherland. nice to see you. we have called it a landmark ruling. how significant is it? i think it is a significant decision. this landmark decision, as you call it, could affect millions of people and it really goes to the heart of the inequality of cohabitees. and the issue is that, whether you are living with someone, for however long, if you are not married and you have not got that certificate, then it will not make any difference unless you take a form on the paperwork. can you explain that? with public sector schemes in the uk and northern ireland, many of these public sector schemes require cohabitees to fill inaform schemes require cohabitees to fill in a form with their partner and lodge it with the scheme so in the event of the partner's death it would be considered, and that would bea
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would be considered, and that would be a requirement in order to receive a survivor's pension. the rules have changed a little bit since, and depending on where you are in the country things will have changed, but it is a difficult area for people to navigate. there is a lot to think about when you take out a pension in the first place. there is clearly a lot to think about if your partner dies. this is the last thing people need to be thinking about. partner dies. this is the last thing people need to be thinking aboutm certainly is, yes. and that is why this has been a very sensible and understandable decision of the supreme court. many of these public sector schemes still require surviving cohabitees to show that they were in genuine and lasting relationships, irrespective of filling in the nomination form, and thatis filling in the nomination form, and that is why the nomination form didn't really add anything in practice. and so we had this ruling which came out yesterday, will set a precedent? it does, the supreme court is the highest in the land, if you like. the case in question
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really related to the northern ireland local government pension scheme, but this could affect other cohabitees in uk public sector schemes, so we cohabitees in uk public sector schemes, so we are cohabitees in uk public sector schemes, so we are talking about nhs staff, teachers, police, civil servants, firefighters, this decision could be relevant to those who are co—habiting. decision could be relevant to those who are co-habiting. what does it mean if people have been through this already and not been able to claim their partner's pension when they have died ? claim their partner's pension when they have died? can it be backdated? can you claim after the event?” think now that this decision means that the government is forced to revisit past cases where cohabitees have been refused a survivor ‘s pension purely because this nomination form has not been lodged. what do people need to do? how would you even start this process if you have been through this and weren't able to claim your partner's pension? i imagine that the schemes and the government will be considering communicating the wall potentially affected members but if you are a cohabitees who has been a member of a you are a cohabitees who has been a member ofa uk you are a cohabitees who has been a member of a uk public sector scheme, i would be writing to the scheme and lodging the facts with the scheme that you are a cohabitees, and for
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those who have had surviving pensions refused on the basis that no form had been lodged, i would ring that to the attention of the scheme. and so the onus will be on the industry to communicate that, will it? they will be looking at how they process some of these claims and what they do from here on. indeed, and it is a bit of a headache for the government. there are millions of people in these schemes, it is a bit of an exercise for them but it can't hurt for the people who think they may be affected to contact their schemes and raise it with them. a really interesting area, and a really important case. more from me after seven a.m.. i will see you then. denzel washington is one of hollywood's biggest stars, and already has two 0scars under his belt, so can he make it a hat—trick with his best actor nomination this year, for his film fences? charlie went to ask him what he thought of his chances of winning, and his opinion of america's new president. lovely to see you. thank you. are
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you well? i am jetlagged. lovely to see you. thank you. are you well? i amjetlagged. we lovely to see you. thank you. are you well? i am jetlagged. we just got here like two hours ago. it is not easy for me to admit that i have been standing in the same place the 18 years. well, i have been standing with you. i have been right here with you. i have been right here with you, troy. i had a life too. troy starts off as a rather lovable, bombastic man who likes the sound of his own voice. we have all been guilty of that sometimes, haven't we? you know what it is? is like there is a ritual on friday night, and troy is the television. it is the same stories he always tells, and it seemed wonderful until it ain't. answer me when i speak to you, don't you eat everyday? yes. got clothes on your back? yes, sir.
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why do you think that is? because you like me? like you? if there is a theme in the film it is people's ability to change or not to change. would you say that is right?m ability to change or not to change. would you say that is right? it is fair. because it is a time in history when a lot is changing in america, and troy is a character who is not adapting to that change, or maybe not seeing around him. would that be right? he is actually wanting to effect change. he is trying to become a driver. he is trying to become a driver. he is trying to become a driver. he is trying to move up. now, the small detail in the play is that he doesn't know how to drive. he doesn't know how to drive. he doesn't even know how to drive, or read, but he wants that. so in some senseit read, but he wants that. so in some sense it is ridiculous, but it is also admirable. on the theme of change, right now, in the world we live in, there is a lot of change going on. yes. are you comfortable about the changes that are happening, for example in the us right now? understand this. i have
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been talking about this years ago, third wave or future shock. we went from an agricultural society to an industrial society. the third wave is the information age. there are millions of people that are falling in the gap because they don't fit in to this information age. i don't ca re to this information age. i don't care who you are, you could promise people whole lot, but there is a whole lot of people that are going to... that are in trouble right now, because they just don't fit to... that are in trouble right now, because theyjust don't fit in. it is no coincidence that the places that were at the height of the industrial revolution in america, pittsburgh, the rustbelt, are suffering the worst right now. and those other places, of course, where donald trump... and they are frustrated. and i don't care which president it is. they can't promise them anything, and those jobs aren't
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coming back. i don't care who promise is you that. when people hear you talking as passionately as you just did about the people who don't have a voice, and who need a voice, they might think one day denzel washington might like to have a bigger voice, voice in government. you have got to stay in your lan. i am not running for... for what? you have got to stay in your lan. i am not running for... forwhat? i don't want any of that —— stay in your lan. would you ever? i would never, ever ever ever. that is a very definitive never, ever ever ever. you can tell he is very passionate, he feels very passionately, and all his thoughts about america at the moment are built on a genuine knowledge about the way the system works. and it is interesting, the film, fences, is about a man who likes the sound of his own voice. denzel washington has an amazing voice. when you sit in the room with him, he has the
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ability to fill the room with sound, and of course his father, himself, was a preacher. there is a bit of that in him. when you ask him a question about what it is like in america right now, he has a theory and wants to get it out there. it is and wants to get it out there. it is a very moving film, fences, and we will hear more about it later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. police are looking for the person responsible for putting up racist and antisemitic stickers on the underground. british transport police have released this image of a man they want help tracing, after stickers with nazi terminology and swastikas were found at piccadilly circus and covent garden. it comes almost a week after a group of commuters in new york came together, using hand sanitiser and tissues, to remove racist graffiti they found on a subway carriage. a new centre to support victims of female genital mutilation, thought to be the first of its kind, will open in reading. 0rganisers say it is the only centre
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to bring together teams of health and law experts with communities where fgm is more common. this woman said that she only escaped fgm as a child by running away from home, and that her mother has never forgiven her. i was at an age of about four or five years old when my grandparents started speaking to me about being cut. she feels like i'm the one who sort of, you know, sort of discouraged her from letting this happen, because she says that her life has been ruined as a result of me not getting cut. an nhs nurse who died after he set himself alight outside kensington palace killed himself while his mind was disturbed, according to a coroner. an inquest into amin abdullah‘s death heard he died in february last year after losing hisjob at charing cross hospital. the coroner said he had been suffering from depression following a disciplinary matter at work. so to the travel now: first the tubes: the district line has some minor delays between earls court and wimbledon,
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because of late—finishing engineering work. but it looks like all other lines are ok at the moment. 0n the roads, this is blackwall lane. you can see the usual traffic around this time for those travelling northbound on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. and in westminster, great george street remains closed eastbound, from birdcage walk to parliament square, for cycle highway works. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday it was cloudy and cold. today we are going to be keeping all of that thick, low cloud, and it is going to feel even colder. we might even see a few wintry flurries here and there, particular out towards the east. now, to start this morning, we've got temperatures hovering around the freezing mark. not too much on the way of frost, though, because it is so dry. we've got a very raw, easterly wind, that is going to be blowing in a few showers at times. most of these showers are going to fall as drizzle, not amounting to very much at all,
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but you might see a little bit of sleet and snow in the mix towards essex and kent. 0vernight, the risk of a few wintry flurries here and there, tending to be light in nature. but watch out for a little bit of ice on surfaces tomorrow morning, temperatures again hovering around the freezing mark. tomorrow could be the coldest day of the next few. again, it is going to feel very raw with that easterly wind. a few light, wintry flurries here and there, not really amounting to very much at all, though, and that risk will continue over the course of the weekend. so for the weekend, again, plenty of cloud around. it will start to get a bit less cold as we head into the start of next week. see you soon. hello.
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this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. record waiting times at a&e departments in english hospitals, according to figures seen by the bbc. emergency departments suffered their worst performance last month, since the target to see patients within four hours was brought in 13 years ago. good morning. it's thursday, the 9th of february. also this morning: say aye! as theresa may gets the all—clear to trigger article 50, the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will be here to tell us what he wants to see from the brexit negotiations. as experts warn that new booster seat rules risk leaving parents confused, we'll explain what the changes mean for you. it's been a high street favourite since the 1970s,
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but the owner of body shop could be looking to sell it off. so, what next for the struggling retailer? leicester have their first home win of the year. demarai gray scores in extra time to help them beat derby in their fa cup fourth—round replay. and carol has the weather. i've been talking fatherhood, fake news, and the changing face of us politics, with denzel washington. would you never? never, ever, ever, ever. what was he referring to, becoming president of america. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold start. it will be cold for the next few days. the best of the sunshine in the west. wintry showers coming in from the east on a keen wind. more details in
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15 minutes. thanks, carol. see you ina bit. good morning. first, our main story. accident and emergency departments in england last month had their worst waiting time performance since targets were introduced. that's according to provisional figures leaked to the bbc. the data also suggests that record numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed to become available. with more here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. for months now, accident and emergency departments across england have been struggling. last week, the bbc was given exclusive access to the royal blackburn hospital where the pressure on it was easy to see. new data leaked from the nhs says it is a similar
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picture across england. provisional figures appeared to show that last month, 82% of patients were treated, admitted, and discharged within four hours, the worst performance since the target of 95% was produced in 2004. 780 patients waited for more than 12 hours for a bed after being admitted to hospital by a doctor, known as a trolley wait. again, the worst on record. and more than 60,000 waited more between four and 12 hours, more than since 2004. if the figures are correct, it shows the degree of pressure the nhs is under. that's despite huge efforts from 1.4 million staff. the nhs is really struggling to cope with extra demand, record levels of demand. these figures are the worst since the four—hour a&e target was introduced. it shows the pressure the nhs is under. the nhs in scotland is coping better, but similar issues affect wales and northern ireland, symptoms of the pressure building across health and social care.
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nhs sources acknowledge the system is facing unprecedented demand. and these latest figures suggest there is little sign of respite. dominic hughes, bbc news. the government has told the house of lords not to block brexit after mps overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger article 50, with a majority of four to one. the brexit secretary, david davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty" and pass the legislation. more than 50 labour mps defied the three—line whip imposed by their leader, jeremy corbyn, and voted against the bill. here's our political correspondent, tom bateman. as many of that opinion say "aye." the message was clear. mps gave their overwhelming support for theresa may's plan to get on with brexit talks. the ayes to the right... it is an historic vote today. and it got through with a large majority every turn. it has carried out the will
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of the british people. that is what parliament has done today. and it has put through a bill is very simple, just 137 words long, authorising us to do what the people wanted. the scottish national party fought the bill all the way. they lost, but they sung the european anthem in defiance. the threat of a conservative rebellion fell away, but 52 labour mps, including shadow cabinet member, clive lewis, defied jeremy corbyn to vote against the bill. lib dems called for a referendum on the exit deal. what you have done is allow a stitch—up, the 21st century equivalent of a con job. 80% of people will be dissatisfied with what is imposed upon them.
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theresa may left after the vote clearing a first hurdle in parliament. now the bill goes to the house of lords, where it may need yet more opposition. tom bateman, bbc news, westminster. and picking up on that house of lords process, our political correspondent, carol walker, is in westminster this morning. so, this passes onto the house of lords. questions on what happens there. but questions tojeremy corbyn about what this means for him. ministers hoped that thumping majority they got in the house of commons last night will send a strong signal to the house of lords. downing street sources suggested that if the lords were too tried to stop the process, they could be abolished. amendments to the bill will probably be put down. there will probably be put down. there will not be too many problems. the government will be able to trigger article 50 and begin those formal negotiations by the end of march. as you mentioned, ithink negotiations by the end of march. as you mentioned, i think the bigger problem immediately is the one facing labour leaderjeremy corbyn.
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he has four positions in the shadow cabinet to fill and has to decide what action to take if any against more than a dozen junior shadow ministers who defied his instructions and voted against the bill. the bigger problem for the labour party are the divisions laid bare on perhaps the biggest issue facing the country at the moment. carol, thank you very much. just after 8am, we'll be discussing this with labour leader, jeremy corbyn. we will ask about the resignations and what he is aiming to achieve in the coming months and years after the coming months and years after the brexit negotiations. a new law designed to help protect people in england from so—called "revenge evictions" by rogue landlords isn't working, according to senior mps and housing lawyers. a bbc freedom of information request has revealed that there may be hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants, afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted. this report from daniel whitworth. the labour peer who campaigned
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for unaccompanied migrant children to come to the uk, has said the government's decision to stop the programme is shameful. when the dubs scheme was introduced last year, campaigners hoped thousands of children would benefit, but the actual numbers have been much lower. alexandra mackenzie reports. vulnerable and scared. many children remain in camps across europe. an estimated 90,000 are alone with no family. following intense pressure last year, the then following intense pressure last year, the then prime minister, david cameron, introduced a programme to give sanctuary to some. campaigners had hoped 3000 unaccompanied children with no links to the uk would benefit. instead, 350 will be taken in before this scheme ends next month. applause. it was designed by lord dubs, a former refugee who fled from the nazis himself. i am very, very disappointed.
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i was in greece a month ago. desperate conditions in the camps. many unaccompanied children who are bitterly cold and miserable we need to help them. there has been widespread condemnation. 0pposition parties have called the move a betrayal of vulnerable children and british values, and called on the government to revive the dubs amendment. some youngsters were taken to this location in devon. the home office says it is a matter of resources, a balance between enabling children to enter the country, while ensuring that local councils have the capacity to look after them. alexander mackenzie, bbc news. tributes have continued to be paid to tara palmer—tomkinson after her shock death, aged just 45. the actress and model became an "it—girl" in the 90s and wrote about her life as an aristocrat and her close ties to the royal family. she was found dead in her london home after revealing that she had a brain tumour in november last year. the us senate has approved president trump's choice of attorney general, jeff sessions.
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mr trump criticised efforts by democrats to block the appointment. mr sessions was denied a post as a federaljudge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied the allegations. jane austin's mr darcy from pride and prejudice is one of the most admired and romantic leading men in literary history. when colin firth played him he was famously tall, dark and handsome, but that might not have been the case according to new research. this portrait by british academics paints a very different picture of mr darcy, giving him a pale face, powdered white hair, a long nose and a pointy chin. he's a far cry from the brooding mr darcy created by filmmakers. quite different from colin firth,
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but the both look good to me. and he's made up anyway so you can think what you like! doesn't matter. as a way of keeping tabs on a&e waiting times, a target was brought in 13 years ago which said 95% of patients should be seen within four hours. but figures leaked to the bbc suggest that last month saw emergency departments at hospitals in england suffered their worst ever performance since the target was introduced. the department of health insists the vast majority of patients were treated quickly. let's talk to dr taj hassan, the president of the royal college of emergency medicine. let's talk to dr taj hassan, the president of the royal college of emergency medicine. good morning to you, dr taj hassan. what do you make of the leaked figures, 82% for example not being seen figures, 82% for example not being seen within the four hours, leaving some people who are not. is that in tune with what you are hearing and seeing? they certainly do. the figures showed the remarkable state of the nhs and emergency care systems. unfortunately that is how
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they are in the moment in this country. they are keeping with the downward incline, the decline, of performance in our systems over the past performance in our systems over the pa st two performance in our systems over the past two years. we predicted this would happen back and set number. so it comes as unfortunately no surprise to us. —— back in september. this is depressing and the bbc has been describing in graphic detail some of the pressures staff and emergency staff are having in trying to deliver safe care. that is something that is not sustainable, unfortunately. so, do you think this four hour target is unrealistic? not at all. the four hour standard is a reflection of the whole system. it is notjust what is happening in the emergency department, but unfortunately, the consequences play out very graphically in the emergency department with crowded departments,
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resulting in care not being delivered in a timely fashion. pain relief is not given in a timely fashion. assessment is not given in a timely fashion. so, what we need to do is look at the causes, and the causes are threefold. we unfortunately do not have enough money to fund social care, so patients who are fit for medical discharge in hospital beds are stuck rather than being discharge in hospital beds are stuck ratherthan being in discharge in hospital beds are stuck rather than being in the community we re rather than being in the community were them and their families want them to be. we do not have enough beds. and increased demand is having a tremendous effect on nurses and doctors and the department who are just trying to deliver good care. we need more staff for those departments and other aspects of the re st of departments and other aspects of the rest of the hospital to be able to cope. you mentioned the problem and the cause is being threefold, and to solve those would need money. if you look at the money spent on the nhs, it is increasing. last year it was
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£140 billion, ten times more than 60 yea rs £140 billion, ten times more than 60 years ago. is this just about money? are there more things that could be done as well? i think the nhs is different to where it was 60 years ago. but no doubt all independent observers have shown proportionately we are spending less than most of our european partners. in fact, we are probably on the bottom in most oecd countries. we have to change. clinical staff across the country are looking at ways to reconfigure the nhs to make it fit for purpose. but the bottom line is we have cut and cut and cut far too much and we're back the basic skeleton and staff are stretched to their limits and that is unacceptable. it is also, i would say, a leadership moment, notjust for staff also, i would say, a leadership moment, not just for staff and departments trying to deliver good care, but also executive boards and
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trusts and national bodies making submissions to the prime minister, making it clear as to the scale of the challenge and why we need to invest. do you think leadership in hospitals is bad at the moment? no, not at all, in most trusts and hospitals, leadership is showing... crosstalk you say it needs improving? no, what isaid is you say it needs improving? no, what i said is i think there is a need for focus around emergency care at the moment, because, as yourfigures show, the system is unfortunately acutely stressed. ok, thank you very much for your time this morning. thank you. the time is 7:15am. that is our main story this morning. leaked figures show the performance of a&e units in england last month was the worst for 13 years. the government warns the house of lords not to stand in the way of brexit after mps vote overwhelmingly in favour
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of starting the process. we will have a look at some of the front pages for you. on the front of the sun, marking the death of tara palmer tomkinson, police say she was discovered dead in herflat yesterday. the announcement made yesterday. the announcement made yesterday afternoon. tributes coming m, yesterday afternoon. tributes coming in, including from members of the royal family. and the guardian has a picture of her, and it picks up on a story we mentioned, which was to do with the prime minister being a accused of closing the door on child refugees, refusing to resettle 3000 children, which was halted just after 350 were allowed into the country. and jeremy corbyn will join us here later this morning, just after 8a m us here later this morning, just after 8am and of course we will talk to him about brexit and the vote last night in the house of common. it gets the go—ahead from mps and
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now m oves it gets the go—ahead from mps and now moves to the house of lords. many questions forjeremy colburn with another resignation from his shadow cabinet, and he will be here just after 8am —— shadow cabinet, and he will be here just after8am —— —— shadow cabinet, and he will be here just after 8am —— —— corbyn. 0k, now, where is that picture from, thatis now, where is that picture from, that is gorgeous? i think it is from glencoe, because it looks like it, and it is beautiful, you are quite right. sorry, i didn't mean to catch you out. i know, it is another library shot, but it shows what is going on, there is hilson at around and —— hill snow going on, there is hilson at around and —— hillsnow and going on, there is hilson at around and —— hill snow and a set of cloud, even at low levels, and we have this high—pressure area in scandinavia, it is it coming across our shores, blocking the weather front from affecting us, and look at the isobars. it will be windy in the north—west. we have jails in north—west. we have jails in north—west scotland, they will ease
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through the day. dry weather, cold and frosty to start, but these coast of scotla nd and frosty to start, but these coast of scotland and england we have more cloud —— we have gales. at least end into eastern areas, so, right on the coastline and for the next couple of days we have an extra of rain and sleet. you don't have to travel to fight in lan and we have sleet and snow. because they are showers not all of us will see them —— you don't have to travel far inland. in south—west wales it is a cold and frosty start, then we run into cloud for the rest of wales. northern ireland has cloud around with showers, and they will tend to ease. so, through the day, western areas hang onto the sunshine. for central and eastern parts, we have more cloud and wintry showers. don't be disappointed. not all of us will see snow. a lot of us want to see it. we could see one or two centimetres, less tha n could see one or two centimetres, less than an inch, for the north york moors and the grampians.
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0vernight, showers move across southern counties, we hang on to the cloud and showers for central and eastern areas, and it is a cold easterly wind to the west. under clear skies, frost, particularly north—west scotland and west wales, despite the low temperatures and the frost elsewhere, there is too much cloud and breeze to need to scrape your car cloud and breeze to need to scrape yourcar in the cloud and breeze to need to scrape your car in the morning. then we start the same for central and eastern parts, and tomorrow too that accommodation continues, with more significant snowfall for 0rkney & shetland, five or six centimetres. despite the fact there will be sunshine in the west, wherever you are it will be cold. in fact, if affected by the wind, if standing in the wind, it will be much colder than temperatures suggest. then on saturday we continue with rain, sleet and snow but on saturday more comes to the west, some getting into northern ireland, wales and the
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south—west. the best sunshine for the north—west. it is feeling cold in the wind, and it will feel raw, charlie and steph, by sunday. jilly for now, but getting warmer, thank you. —— chilly. ben has more on that and the other main business stories. yes, iam yes, i am going to start with body shop. good morning. body shop could be looking for a new owner. the firm, owned by l'0real, has 3,000 stores in 66 countries but sales are down sharply and losses last year grew to nearly £20 million. the company has blamed a slowdown overseas and l'oreal is now looking into a potential sale. we will talk about that in half an hour. democrats have condemned president donald trump's tweet attacking a clothing retailer after it dropped a fashion line owned by his daughter. mr trump tweeted that "ivanka has been treated so unfairly" by clothing retailer nordstrom. a democratic senator called the post "inappropriate" and an ex—white house ethics tsar
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dubbed it "outrageous". earlier this month nordstrom became the fifth retailer to drop the ivanka trump clothing line, citing lack of sales. travel firm thomas cook has reported losses of £67 million, it did that in the last 20 minutes, and warned that it remains cautious about the rest of the year, given the uncertain political and economic outlook. the firm says bookings to greece are up by over 40%, and destinations like cyprus, bulgaria, portugal and croatia have also seen strong demand. that's helping make up for a fall in sales to turkey and egypt as tourists are deterred by recent terror attacks. we will talk more about the body shop story in about half an hour. thank you. the rules on child booster seats in cars are due to change next month, but many parents say the new regulations have left them confused. so, to try and clear things up, let's take a look at what the present guidelines are, and how they will differ in future. currently, parents in the uk can use
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backless booster seats for children who weigh 15 kilograms or more. that's two stone, five pounds. under the new rules, in order use a backless booster seat, children must weigh over 22 kilograms, three—stone—seven, and be over 125 centimetres tall, which is four—foot—one. that means children between 15kg and 22kg will now have to be put in booster seats with backs. but there is an exception to the new rules. parents and guardians who already have a backless booster seat can continue using it. for more on these changes, let's speak to nick lloyd, road safety manager at the royal society for the prevention of accidents. good morning. good morning. before we start getting into the practicality, do you welcome the changes, is it a step forward in safety? it is potentially a step forward. it is confusing currently because what will happen is with the new un
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regulations that we will have two types of booster cushions, which is this one here, which will be available for parents to buy. 0ur advice is to go for one of these seats, which is a high backed booster seat. let's go back this is the booster cushion. yes. you say that there will be two versions? that is right. as you said in your introduction, this one is suitable for children that weigh 15 kg, up to 36 kg, and the new regulations will mean that manufacturers will be making seats that are from 22 kg up to 36 kg and, crucially as well, children must be of a height of 125 centimetres. it makes it confusing. short of a taping measure, why can't they go by age? child car seats, as
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technology advances, have become so complicated. we have a website, child car seats .org.uk, which has 2 million hits per year because pa rents a re million hits per year because parents are confused about the seats that they can purchase. 0ur if isis to look at the website, do your research, —— our advice is to look at the website, do your research, look at the maximum age it is appropriate for, look at the weight and plan from birth on what sort of seat that you are going to go for and work through. 0ur seat that you are going to go for and work through. our advice is simple. don't worry much about booster cushions and the new regulations. actually don't use one of these. we don't think they are dangerous, parents can use the old style seat, they don't have to throw it away, there is nothing wrong with them. these are safer seats. this
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seat, a high—backed boots deceit, one with a back on, this goes up, it is suitable from about six years up to 12, so it has a huge ages span and these are safer because, as you can see, viewers will be able to see, they offer considerably more protection than a cushion. you will be aware that people think this is more convenient, you can take it out quickly, it is less cumbersome, but you say not as safe? not as safe, research p roves you say not as safe? not as safe, research proves these are safer and thatis research proves these are safer and that is why it we advise to go for one of these seats rather than the booster cushion. what we are not saying is that they are dangerous and shouldn't be used. as you say, they serve a very useful purpose. they are extremely light, easy to fit, they are great to transport from one car to another, so parents, grandparents and whatever — they
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serve a useful purpose, but to stress, they are not as safe as these because they don't give as much protection in the event of a collision. ok, thank you very much for your time this morning. he regulations in relation to the booster seats. and if you want to see how they suit you, you might wa nt to see how they suit you, you might want to see that information on facebook and twitter, so have a look online. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. let me ask you a question, i am a journalist now. go ahead. is there some troy in new? he is a rather bombastic father figure in this very moving film. he has a lot to say about many things, talking of little about many things, talking of little about politics, a little about fake news as well. yeah, good interview. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. police are looking for the person responsible for putting up racist and antisemitic stickers on the underground. british transport police have released this image of a man they want help tracing, after stickers with nazi terminology and swastikas were found at piccadilly circus and covent garden. it comes almost a week after a group of commuters in new york came together, using hand sanitiser and tissues, to remove racist graffiti they found on a subway carriage. a new centre to support victims of female genital mutilation, thought to be the first of its kind, will open in reading. 0rganisers say it is the only centre to bring together teams of health and law experts with communities where fgm is more common. this woman said that she only escaped fgm as a child by running away from home, and that her mother has never forgiven her. i was at an age of about four or five years old when my
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grandparents started speaking to me about being cut. she feels like i'm the one who sort of, you know, sort of discouraged her from letting this happen, because she says that her life has been ruined as a result of me not getting cut. an nhs nurse who died after he set himself alight outside kensington palace killed himself while his mind was disturbed, according to a coroner. an inquest into amin abdullah‘s death heard he died in february last year after losing hisjob at charing cross hospital. the coroner said he had been suffering from depression following a disciplinary matter at work. so to the travel now: first the tubes: the district line has some minor delays between earls court and wimbledon. 0n the roads, in bowes park, a three vehicle accident means one lane is blocked in both directions on the north circular near thejunction with powys lane. these are the westbound delays, which are back to the a10. and in central london, high holborn is closed eastbound from chancery lane station to holborn circus. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini.
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hello, good morning. yesterday it was cloudy and cold. today we are going to be keeping all of that thick, low cloud, and it is going to feel even colder. we might even see a few wintry flurries here and there, particular out towards the east. now, to start this morning, we've got temperatures hovering around the freezing mark. not too much on the way of frost, though, because it is so dry. we've got a very raw, easterly wind, that is going to be blowing in a few showers at times. most of these showers are going to fall as drizzle, not amounting to very much at all, but you might see a little bit of sleet and snow in the mix towards essex and kent. 0vernight, the risk of a few wintry flurries here and there, tending to be light in nature. but watch out for a little bit of ice on surfaces tomorrow morning, temperatures again hovering around the freezing mark. tomorrow could be the coldest day of the next few. again, it is going to feel very raw with that easterly wind. a few light, wintry flurries here and there, not really amounting to very much at all, though, and that risk will continue over the course of the weekend.
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so for the weekend, again, plenty of cloud around. it will start to get a bit less cold as we head into the start of next week. you can get plenty more news on our website, at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and steph. see you soon. hello. this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. the time is 7:30. accident and emergency departments in england last month suffered their worst waiting time performance since targets were introduced, according to provisional data leaked to the bbc. the department of health insists the vast majority of patients were treated quickly. the figures also suggest that record numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed to become available. we u nfortu nately we unfortunately do not have enough money to fund social care. so
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patients who are fit for discharge from the beds us dark rather than being in the community where they and their family want them to be. being in the community where they and theirfamily want them to be. —— are stuck. it is having a tremendous negative effect on the nurses and dog is in the department. -- doctors. the government has told the house of lords not to block brexit, after mps overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger article 50, with a majority of four to one. the brexit secretary, david davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty" and pass the legislation. more than 50 labour mps defied the three—line whip imposed by their leader, jeremy corbyn, and voted against the bill. new laws introduced last year to protect tenants from so called revenge evictions aren't working. that's according to mps and housing lawyers. a bbc freedom of information request has found that there may be hundreds of thousands of tenants afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics, and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted. tributes continue to be paid
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to tara palmer—tomkinson after her death at the age of 45. the actress and model became an "it—girl" in the 90s. she was born into aristocracy and had close ties to the royal family. she was found dead in her london home. in november last year, she revealed that she had a brain tumour. the us senate has approved president trump's choice of attorney general, jeff sessions. mr trump criticised efforts by democrats to block the appointment. mr sessions was denied a post as a federaljudge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied the allegations. if you lived in russia and had a constant supply of snow, what would you make? asnow man? maybe an igloo? well, one man from the village of sosnovka decided to build the chilliest church in the world. he spent every day for two months constructing it, even when the temperatures plunged below —30. he did it so the villagers had
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a place to pray as there isn't a church nearby. where it is again? look at that. he said building the alter and getting the cross on the roof were the most difficult parts of the build. waking at —30 sounds the hardest.” was trying to think of a link to the sport. it has got a roof... what, like the millennium stadium? i know that you saw the name of the village approaching on the cuer and thought i will stop here and she would have to say it! now we know. next time we have to see it we will be lasting.
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so will leicester fans. —— have to see it we will be lasting. so will leicesterfans. —— laughing. struggling premier league champions, leicester city, are through to the fifth round of the fa cup following a replay against derby county. they came through 3—1 after extra time. his first goal for the club. and demarai gray's superb solo goal secured their place in the fifth round. leicester now play millwall away. we want to do well in the competition where we play. of course we want to go forward in the fa cup. the premier league is not so good, but we have to play in the premier league. and then there is sunday. tonight was about the squad and the injured players getting back in the game. we missed the opportunity in the first game. we did not want a replay. it was a fantastic game. fantastic support from our fans. and i could not fault the players.
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i think he was a little bit more cross than he was showing there. mps will debate the football associations "failure to reform" later today. it follows a motion of no confidence in the governing body. parliament will examine whether the fa is fit for purpose. lastjuly, sports minister, tracey crouch, said the governing body would lose its £30 million to £40 million of public funding if it did not reform. we have heard from tiger woods overnight. he said strong things in the interview. he said he will never feel great again. he pulled out because of back spasms. he admitted there were times when he simply did not ever think he would return to golf. hundreds gathered for the funeral of former england women's cricket captain, rachael heyhoe flint, yesterday. she was a vice president of wolverhampton wanderers and people lined the streets and applauded as the limousines
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passed the club's ground molineux. baroness heyhoe flint, who captained england between 1966 and 1978, was seen as a pioneer in women's cricket. she died aged 77 after a short illness. world champion, mark selby, suffered a shock first—round defeat to world number 18, martin gould, at snooker‘s world grand prix in preston yesterday. better news for australia's neil robertson. he compiled a century break in the first frame of his match with ricky walden. he won 4—2. he'll face ronnie 0'sullivan in the next round. britain is aiming to become one of the world's top five skiing and snowboarding nations by 2030. in a year's time, the winter 0lympics take place in pyeongchang, south korea, and uk sport says great britain can achieve its best ever games. at around 8:40, we'll be talking to olympic bronze medal winning snowboarder, jennyjones, and teamgb hopeful freestyle skier, rowan cheshire. a little bit more skiing coming up injust a moment.
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all about how things have changed and why it is becoming more popular and why it is becoming more popular and different types of snowboarding and different types of snowboarding and other things are very popular now. thank you very much. when aston hall psychiatric hospital in derbyshire closed in the 1990s, dozens of former patients began to come forward saying they had been experimented on and abused there. the hospital has been accused of using a discredited "truth serum" therapy on patients as young as 11. in a moment, we'll speak to a woman who was a patient at aston hall in the 1970s, but first here's a brief history of what's alleged to have taken place there. a country house, the 18th—century aston hall near darby was a 1970
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psychiatric hospital. dozens of the child patients from the 1960s and 70s now claimed that the hospital's head doctor, the late dr kenneth milner, carried out experiments on of them. they claim to have been injected with a powerful drug. it was used to sedate shell shocked troops in world war two. it was later used as the so—called "truth drug". there are also reports it can be used to create false memories. dr milner died in 1976 on the hospital was closed in the 1990s. it was only when derelict pictures of it came online that the stories came to light. both the police and the department of health are both investigating the allegations. we'rejoined now by barbara 0'hare, a former patient at aston hall, who has written a book
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about her experiences. thank you for coming on to talk us. you are welcome. having read the book, i have to say what you have gone through in your life in every element, notjust gone through in your life in every element, not just the gone through in your life in every element, notjust the hospital, but every element of your life, it feels like you have been let down massively, not just by like you have been let down massively, notjust by the hospital, but the care system generally. i mean, how have you managed to cope? i think that each experience makes you stronger. i think that is exactly what it does. so, for you, you just feel like every experience you just feel like every experience you have bad, you just got stronger. it hardens you up a bit. it is a bit like grieving. you have to get over it. you get stronger as time goes by andi it. you get stronger as time goes by and ijust grew up that it. you get stronger as time goes by and i just grew up that way. that it. you get stronger as time goes by and ijust grew up that way. that is the way it is. take us back early on in the story. one of the issues... some of these are very harrowing and we cannot go into some details about what happened in the hospital
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itself. but take us back in the story a little bit to why it was you ended up in that situation and why you were in such a vulnerable situation early on. because many people will think that there might have been a point at which somebody could have got involved in your life. yes. originally, my father was left on his own. my mother left. she was not seen. my father was left by himself to raise a little girl. —— sane. himself to raise a little girl. —— sane. how old were you? 11, 12, there is no specific time when that happened. my poor dad was left to bring upa happened. my poor dad was left to bring up a little girl on his own. so, you know, you have to understand what he went through as well. and then you moved from various family member... my father looked for foster carers. and then this private foster carers. and then this private foster carers. and then this private
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foster carer not greedy. she approached social services and got money off of them as well as my father. and she was very, very, very abusive, as i have stated in the book. many people who have read the story will think at this point how is that no one wanted to get involved in what was happening in your life? if you want to know the truth, and i will say it, even if it is on television, the social services, according to my reports, we re services, according to my reports, were well aware that i was getting abused but let it happen. i was running away and doing everything i could not to go home, doing everything i could to get attention. i was basically crying out for help rather than going home. when her husband came in i would be rejected and sometimes he would not come in until late. that is why i would wait. —— protected. the signs were there. i was too frightened to talk about the beatings and tell them that. i kept hoping they would take me away and then i would tell them.
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but she was beating me and saying things about my mother who why did not know. i decided i will find my own way. and then eventually, through being in various homes, you ended up being in the hospital in aston hall, didn't you?” ended up being in the hospital in aston hall, didn't you? i ended up ina home aston hall, didn't you? i ended up in a home in derby. there is a lot of talk about it. i know many who went to aston hall, as was mentioned in the inside out programme a couple of days ago with simon. in each chapter, bits of your life get worse if you read the book. it feels like at each stage another terrible thing happens. now, as you look back and think about other people slides, and maybe people who are in care now, who maybe need to tell someone and
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alert someone, do you have any more faith in the system now? —— people's lives. none whatsoever in the social ca re system. lives. none whatsoever in the social care system. i would like to say i do not want anyone in care. social services is one thing. i think that if children were in care it is important they have a body, the body stays with them throughout the care system, a friend, maybe, you know, someone system, a friend, maybe, you know, someone who will take them to the cinema, someone who will text them, who has to be not the foster parent but a social worker. that was my problem. obviously, now, having gone through everything you have been through, you decided to write about it. has that helped you in any way? 0h it. has that helped you in any way? oh my god. it is unbelievable. first of all, ijust oh my god. it is unbelievable. first of all, i just started writing oh my god. it is unbelievable. first of all, ijust started writing and did not mean to do a book. but another survivor, i will not mention her name, a lovely girl, she went through a similar experience in a place in kent in a place called
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kendall house. that inspired me. if she can do it, i will do what she did. and obviously that led to the book. many people have come forward. what happened was i was getting flashbacks and panic attacks. there was nothing on my medical records so the doctors could not help me at you knowanyway, the doctors could not help me at you knowa nyway, after the doctors could not help me at you knowanyway, after a the doctors could not help me at you knowa nyway, after a long the doctors could not help me at you knowanyway, after a long time, i found someone on the internet with a similar story to tell. then there we re similar story to tell. then there were three of us. eventually it grew. it was hard to get the media on board. and now they are coming forward every day. can i ask you, how important is it to you, the doctors involved in what happens to you died many years ago, how important is it to you that there is an investigation and this is pursued? —— an investigation and this is pursu 7 —— it is very important, notjust to
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me, but to the survivors, you know. we need to know who authorised this, you know. there is a million questions we need answering to get closure. 0ne questions we need answering to get closure. one thing does worry me, you have to remember, for people listening to this, this is a one in a million doctor. don't think all doctors are like this. they appreciate you coming to tell your story. it is a very harrowing read. thank you for your time. thank you for having me. god bless you. and good luck with everything as well. barbara 0'hare's book is called the hospital. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it will be cold today, for the next couple of days, and some will have wintry showers, so a mix of rain and sleet on the coast, inland sleet and snow. high pressure
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is currently dominating the weather, the air is coming from the cold continent and effectively blocking the weather fronts from the atlantic. if you look at the isobars, you atlantic. if you look at the isoba rs, you can atlantic. if you look at the isobars, you can tell it will be windy, especially in the west. we have gales across north—west scotland, they will ease through the day. it is frosty to start. watch out for eyes. the best of the sunshine in the west because central and eastern parts. we are looking at and eastern parts. we are looking at a lot of cloud first thing also wintry showers. through the afternoon, it will be cloudy in scotla nd afternoon, it will be cloudy in scotland with wintry showers along the coast, the same for the east coast of england, and you will find it will be rain or sleet, but inland showers will be sleet and snow. that continues through the afternoon. a cold stay in prospect. you might see some rain showers with sleet. to the south—west, we come back under the clear skies with showers possible at
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times in cornwall. in western parts of wales, you hang on to the sunshine, elsewhere it will be cloudy in wales and feeling cold. and for northern ireland, once again, variable amounts of cloud and no heatwave. through the evening and overnight we hang onto this keen easterly wind. where we have clear skies for the north—west scotland and wales you are likely to see frost, so you may well the scraping your car windscreen. for the rest of the country, there will be cloud around, a breeze and temperatures around, a breeze and temperatures around freezing, but less likely to be scraping your car as a result in the morning. tomorrow we start with clear skies to the west, which means the sunshine. for the rest of us, cloudy, wintry showers, on the coast, sleet and rain, inland, sleet and snow, but for 0rkney & shetland five to six centimetres, and despite the fact your thermometer might read the fact your thermometer might read the temperatures as three or four, it will feel colder than that with
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the wind. as we head into saturday, well, once again, the combination of rain, sleet and snow, more organised, as you can see, drifting further west, bringing some of that into wales, south—west england and northern ireland. the wind has changed direction to an north—easterly, so it is exacerbating the cold feel. and then when we get to sunday it will feel raw. a fair bit of cloud around and that mix of wintry showers. thank you. high street favourite the body shop could be up for sale when it's owner l'0real reports annual results later today. good morning. it has been on many high street since the 1970s. the chances are you might have a product in your bathroom. the body shop hit
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the high street in the 1970s with an ethical stance on animal welfare and it was a huge success, expanding across the world by the 1990s. after across the world by the 1990s. after a stock market flotation it was joked that their shares defied gravity. its founder anita roddick used her business to campaign animal testing, the environment and body image. she sold it off in 2006 to international cosmetics giant l'0realfor international cosmetics giant l'0real for over £600 million. with me now is professor cathy parker, a specialist in the high street. morning to use. morning. there is a tendency to think of the body shop asa tendency to think of the body shop as a small retailer. it is owned by one of the biggest cosmetic firms in the world, l'0real, why do they want to get rid of it? they have a massive portfolio and they buy a brand that will return a good
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investment to them. and body shop isn't doing as well, so they want to buy another brand and get the money that way. what has gone wrong, if it isn't returning the money, where did it lose its way? on many high streets, many have these products at home, so what has changed? when l'0real bought the body shop, it was ata time l'0real bought the body shop, it was at a time when people started to get concerned about ethical issue. at the time there wasn't a ban across the time there wasn't a ban across the eu on animals being tested on beauty products, so it was a good opportunity for l'0real to buy into the market which was profitable at that point, but with the eu legislation all products that we buy here in the uk are not tested on animals, so it is difficult for the body shop to stand out and say, why is it different. it has lost its unique selling point, and those ethical issues that it once traded
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on no longer are relevant?” ethical issues that it once traded on no longer are relevant? i think they probably are relevant but people take them for granted because they will get it from most of its products. it has done well. people we re products. it has done well. people were cynical when l'0real took over that it would become another high—street beauty retailer but they have done a lot in biodiversity and ethical procurement, but i don't think they have made enough noise about it and i don't think consumers know that it was all behind the brand. and now anita roddick, when they sold it, obviously, you know, she is no longer with us, associated with that brand, it is difficult for people to know what the body shop is. who would want to buy them? no shortage of private equity companies because it is a massive international chain. they have 3000 stores in 56 countries, so you are buying into a big global market worth about 50 billion x 2020, so it
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is an nundah for forming brand, worth about 50 billion x 2020, so it is an nundah forforming brand, they wa nt to ta ke is an nundah forforming brand, they want to take it over and get a good return. we were talking on favourite products, what is yours? —— it is an underperforming brand. 1980s, coconut shampoo. laughter everyone has one. a lot of people said duberry. satsuma, i loved rubbing it on, or whatever you use to do with it. laughter what was it? all kinds of things, it was a spray, body scrub, moisturiser. have you ever actually tried it? no, iwas scrub, moisturiser. have you ever actually tried it? no, i was making it up. i thought that was obvious! laughter. denzel washington is one of hollywood's biggest stars and already has two 0scars under his belt. so can he make it a hat trick with his best actor nomination this year for his film ‘fences‘? charlie went to ask him what he thought of his chances of winning, and his opinion of america's new president. lovely to see you.
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thank you. are you well? i am jetlagged. we just got here like two hours ago. it is not easy for me to admit that i have been standing in the same place for 18 years. well, i have been standing with you. i have been right here with you, troy. i had a life, too. troy starts off as a rather lovable, bombastic man who likes the sound of his own voice. we have all been guilty of that sometimes, haven't we? you know what it is? it's like there is a ritual on friday night, and troy is the television. it is the same stories he always tells, and it seemed wonderful, until it ain't. answer me when i talk to you! don't you eat every day? yeah... as long as you're in my house you put a "sir" on the end of it when you talk to me. yes, sir. you eat every day? yes, sir. you got a roof over you head? yes, sir. got clothes on your back?
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yes, sir. why you think that is? 'cause of you? hell, i know it's 'cause of me. but why do you think that is? 'cause you like me? like you? if there is a theme in the film, it is people's ability to change, or not to change. would you say that is right? it is fair, because it is a time in history when a lot is changing in america. and troy is a character who is not adapting to that change, or maybe not seeing change around him. would that be right? he is actually wanting to effect change. he is trying to become a driver. he is trying to move up. now, the small detail in the play is that he doesn't know how to drive. he doesn't even know how to drive, or read, but he wants that. so in some sense it is ridiculous, but it is also admirable. 0n the theme of change, right now, in the world we live in, there is a lot of change going on. yes. are you comfortable about the changes that are happening, for example in the us right now? understand this.
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i have been talking about this years ago, the third wave or future shock. we went from an agricultural society to an industrial society. the third wave is the information age. there are millions of people that are falling in the gap, because they don't fit in to this information age. i don't care who you are, you could promise people whole lot, but there is a whole lot of people that are going to... that are in trouble right now, because theyjust don't fit in. it is no coincidence that the places that were at the height of the industrial revolution in america, pittsburgh, the rustbelt, are suffering the worst right now. and those are the places, of course, where donald trump... and they are frustrated. and i don't care which president it is, they can't promise them anything, and those jobs ain't coming back. i don't care who promises you that. when people hear you talking
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as passionately as you just did about the people who don't have a voice, and who need a voice, they might think, one day denzel washington might like to have a bigger voice, voice in government. you have got to stay in your lane. i am not running for... for what? i don't want any of that. would you ever? iwould never, ever, ever, ever. that is no, then. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. police are looking for the person responsible for putting up racist and antisemitic stickers on the underground. british transport police have released this image of a man they want help tracing, after stickers with nazi terminology and swastikas were found
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at piccadilly circus and covent garden. it comes almost a week after a group of commuters in new york came together, using hand sanitiser and tissues, to remove racist graffiti they found on a subway carriage. a new centre to support victims of female genital mutilation, thought to be the first of its kind, will open in reading. 0rganisers say it is the only centre to bring together teams of health and law experts with communities where fgm is more common. this woman said that she only escaped fgm as a child by running away from home, and that her mother has never forgiven her. i was at an age of about four or five years old when my grandparents started speaking to me about being cut. she feels like i'm the one who sort of, you know, sort of discouraged her from letting this happen, because she says that her life has been ruined as a result of me not getting cut. an nhs nurse who died after he set himself alight outside
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kensington palace killed himself while his mind was disturbed, according to a coroner. an inquest into amin abdullah's death heard he died in february last year after losing hisjob at charing cross hospital. the coroner said he had been suffering from depression following a disciplinary matter at work. so to the travel now: first the tubes: a good service all round. 0n the roads, in bowes park, a three vehicle accident means one lane is blocked in both directions on the north circular near thejunction with powys lane. these are the westbound delays, which are back to the woodford new rd at waterworks corner. and high holborn is closed eastbound from chancery lane station to holborn circus. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday it was cloudy and cold. today we are going to be keeping all of that thick, low cloud, and it is going to feel even colder. we might even see a few wintry flurries here and there, particular out towards the east.
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now, to start this morning, we've got temperatures hovering around the freezing mark. not too much on the way of frost, though, because it the air is so dry. we've got a very raw, easterly wind, that is going to be blowing in a few showers at times. most of these showers are going to fall as drizzle, not amounting to very much at all, but you might see a little bit of sleet and snow in the mix towards essex and kent. 0vernight, the risk of a few wintry flurries here and there, tending to be light in nature. but watch out for a little bit of ice on surfaces tomorrow morning, temperatures again hovering around the freezing mark. tomorrow could be the coldest day of the next few. again, it is going to feel very raw with that easterly wind. a few light, wintry flurries here and there, not really amounting to very much at all, though, and that risk will continue over the course of the weekend. so for the weekend, again, plenty of cloud around. it will start to get a bit less cold as we head into the start of next week. you can get plenty more news on our website, at the usual address.
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now, though, it is back to charlie and steph. see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. record waiting times at a&e units in english hospitals, according to figures seen by the bbc. emergency departments suffered their worst performance in 13 years, since the target to see patients within four—hours was brought in. good morning, it's thursday 9th february. also this morning... as many as are of the opinion, say, "aye". to the contrary, as theresa may gets the all—clear to trigger article 50,
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the labour leaderjeremy corbyn will be here to tell us what he wants to see from the brexit negotiations. how a new law to tackle rogue landlords is failing to protect tenants from so—called revenge evictions. travel firm thomas cook reports losses of £67 million, and says it remains cautious about the rest of the year, given political and economic uncertainty. leicester have their first home win of the year. demarai gray scores in extra time to help them beat derby in their fa cup fourth—round replay. and i've been talking to denzel washington. would you never? never, ever, ever, ever. what would he never ever ever ever? get into politics, that is what he would never do. we talked about fatherhood, fake news, and the changing face of us politics. carroll has the weather. the brightest skies will be in the west,
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there will be a keen wind, and i will have more detailed in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. accident and emergency departments in england last month had their worst waiting time performance since targets were introduced 13 years ago. that's according to provisional figures leaked to the bbc. the data also suggests that record numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed to become available. the department of health insists the vast majority of patients were treated quickly. with more, here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. for months now, accident and emergency departments across england have been struggling. last week, the bbc was given exclusive access to the royal blackburn hospital, where the pressure on a&e was plain to see. new data leaked from the nhs suggests it's a similar
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picture across england. provisional figures appeared to show that last month 82% of patients were treated, admitted, and discharged within four hours — the worst performance since the target of 95% was produced in 2004. 780 patients waited for more than 12 hours for a bed after being admitted to hospital by a doctor, known as a trolley wait. again, the worst figures on record. and more than 60,000 waited more between four and 12 hours, more than any time since 2004. if the figures are correct, it shows the degree of pressure the nhs is under. despite huge efforts from 1.4 million staff, the nhs is really struggling to cope with extra demand, record levels of demand. these figures are the worst since the four—hour a&e target was introduced. they just show how theyjust show how much pressure the service is under. the nhs in scotland is coping better, but similar issues affect wales and northern ireland, symptoms of the pressures building
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across health and social care. nhs sources acknowledge the system is facing unprecedented demand. and these latest figures suggest there is little sign of respite. dominic hughes, bbc news. the government has told the house of lords not to block brexit, after mps overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger article 50, with a majority of four to one. the brexit secretary, david davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty" and pass the legislation. 0ur political correspondent carol walker is in westminster this morning. the bill has passed an amended in the house of commons, now the pressure is on the house of lords to pass it as well? that is right, and downing street has softened its tone somewhat from some of the dire warnings from one source some of the dire warnings from one source last night who said that if the house of lords were to try to disrupt the process they would face calls for the house of lords to be abolished. but i think ministers who believe that the thumping majority
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they had in the final vote in the commons sends a very strong signal to the house of lords, and that although there may be some attempts to amend, change the bill, ministers don't really expect too much difficulty from the lords now, and they are pretty confident they will be able to stick to their timetable, trigger article 50 to start formal brexit negotiations by the end of march. the biggest immediate problem is that facing labour leaderjeremy corbyn. we saw last night clive lewis, shadow business secretary, resigned, saying he could not support the bill. jeremy corbyn now has four shadow cabinet posts to fill, he will have to decide what action if any to take against more than a dozen morejunior shadow ministers who defied his instructions and voted against the bill, and although his spokesman has dismissed suggestions he might be setting a date for his departure, i think when you see such huge divisions exposed on what is the
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biggest political issue facing the country, that is a really big problem for the labour party and its leader. thank you very much. jeremy corbyn will be joining us on the server in a few minutes to give us his thoughts on this. a new law designed to help protect people in england from so called revenge evictions by rogue landlords isn't working, according to senior mps and housing lawyers. a bbc freedom of information request has revealed that there may be hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants who are afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted. this report from daniel whitworth. things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers can all badly affect people's health. hello? but here in leeds, there's a concern many are too scared to complain in case their landlord kicks them out. this is rented out as private rented accommodation, people are living here. people paying to rent here, making complaints, nothing happening and they could be under the threat of revenge eviction. that's the reason why they're not
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coming forward to the council to make a complaint. and that's exactly what happened to helen. her and herfamily were hit with a revenge eviction. it was horrible. after months of complaining, we got a firm of solicitors in who deal with properties in these states of disrepair. they checked the property and they agreed it was damp and something needed to be done. so they wrote to our landlord and instructed that work needed to be done on the property. and within a week of him receiving that, we received a section 21 eviction notice pushed under our door. because of what happened to people like helen, a new law was introduced in october 2015 to try to stop retaliatory or so—called "revenge evictions." but we've seen exclusive figures gathered in a freedom of information request gathered from hundreds of councils right across england that show more than half haven't stopped any at all. more than a quarter don't even record figures, and fewer than one in five have taken any action.
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the government says "revenge evictions" are rare, and, thanks to its new law, councils have all the powers they need to stop them. dan whitworth, bbc news. the decision to put a stop to a programme to allow unaccompanied migrant children to come to the uk is "shameful", according to the labour peer who campaigned for it. when the dubs scheme was introduced last year it was hoped thousands of children would benefit. by the time the system closes next month, 350 children will have been taken in. it was designed by lord dubs, a former refugee who fled nazi occupation. i was in greece about a month ago. desperate conditions in the refugee camps there. we owe it to those children. the government ministers said to me, "we intend to accept the letter and spirit of your amendment." my contention is they are not doing that. tributes continue to be paid
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to tara palmer—tomkinson after her death at the age of 45. the actress and model became an it—girl in the 90s. she was born into aristocracy and had close ties to the royal family. she was found dead in her london home. she revealed that she had a brain tumour in november last year. the us senate has approved president trump's choice of attorney general, jeff sessions. mr trump criticised efforts by democrats to block the appointment. mr sessions was denied a post as a federaljudge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied the allegations. last night the government took another step towards brexit — mps voted by a margin of four to one in favour of the eu withdrawal bill, giving theresa may the authority to start the process of leaving the european union. but divisions in the labour ranks emerged with more than 50 mps voting against it, despite their leader saying they should support it. so what does this say about the party?
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the labour leaderjeremy corbyn joins us now. good morning to you, thank you for your time this morning. there is a sense of elation in government circles obviously, theresa may, david davis are elated about what has happened. can you give us a sense of what your thoughts are this morning? there was a referendum, a decision by the people of this country, and we support the result of the referendum and have to carry it out. it doesn't mean we agree with the government, it does mean we have to build good relations with everyone across europe. diane abbott, one of your closest allies, said after the vote last time, which she did not take part in this time round, i think tory brexit is going to bea round, i think tory brexit is going to be a disaster. that was after voting for the bill? she was not voting for the bill? she was not voting for the bill? she was not voting for tory brexit, she was voting, as the rest of us were, to respect the referendum and open the way for negotiations. i had a
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meeting with members of the european parliament yesterday, in two weeks i am eating socialist leaders from across europe to discuss and agree on the relationship we will develop with them in the future. the government does not have a blank cheque to set up an offshore tax haven in britain, all that it has its authority to proceed with negotiations, which is what the referendum was about. but it absolutely does have a blank check. you tweeted last night, the real fight starts now. quite a few people have been in touch with us today, david tweeted this morning, why didn't the real fight starts during the campaign? the referendum campaign? why are you saying the realfight campaign? why are you saying the real fight starts now? we campaigned for a yes vote in the referendum, two thirds of labour supporters voted yes, the majority of labour mps, the vast majority, campaigned for a yes vote. that was our position. the referendum result was different, remember it was the
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largest participation in any electoral process in britain for as long as i can remember, and there was a result, and parliament has to respect that result. moving forward, you can do nothing to stop what the tories want to do, you just had a series of debates, no concession given, that is almost certainly going to happen again. how exactly are you going to affect what the tories‘ negotiate in europe? are you going to affect what the tories' negotiate in europe? at the time theresa may became a minister she was proposing to start article 50 without a parliamentary process, she has been forced into a parliamentary process, forced into it by legal action and opposition. but that has become academic now, nothing has changed. it is not academic, she has to now report to parliament on what she's doing, there has to be a vote in all parliament at the end of this, there has to be... but you have agreed on everything. we have not agreed on
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everything! do you not understand, this was a one clause bill giving the government the power to start the government the power to start the negotiations. in what way are you going to affect what the terms of the negotiation are? they came back, with five months to go, or whatever the timescale is... two yea rs. whatever the timescale is... two years. the next vote will be approximately five months, and it will be the same thing again, you will be the same thing again, you will do the same thing again, vote with the government and nothing will have been achieved? not at all, there will be a repeal bill started in may, a massive piece of legislation, that will be examination line by line of every aspect of the legislation but it is also about the debate we have now, the kind of economy we want. theresa may said that she was prepared to establish some kind of tax haven in britain on the shores of europe, i think that is completely wrong, we will oppose that, campaign against that. we want investment led
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economy, good relationships with europe, to protect workers' writes, maternity leave and paternity leave, issues achieved through european regulation. you have lost another member of your shadow cabinet, clive lewis. people are saying this is a sign of how bad the situation is within the labour party, specifically for you as leader, it is a disaster? no, it is not a disaster. the majority of labour mps voted to trigger article 50. 50 odd voted against it, mainly on the basis of their strong message from their own constituents —— 15 voted against. my feeling is that it was a national referendum and parliament has to respect that. on all the other votes and campaigning points, there is unity. your personal circumstances, i'm aware of theissue personal circumstances, i'm aware of the issue of fake news at the moment. there is a lot of it about! there is a story that you have set a
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date for when you are going to quit as labour leader. is there no truth in that? absolute nonsense. so your future as leader is intact, you have not considered for a moment whether you are damaging the party...” not considered for a moment whether you are damaging the party... i am surprised the bbc is reporting fake news. i am giving you the opportunity to say... i was elected leader of the party, i am proud to leader of the party, i am proud to lead the party, we will go through the process demanding socialjustice in britain, setting out economic plans for investment led economy, opposing this government in the crisis in health care, that is our agenda, that is what unites us, that is what i am doing. and if the polls remain the same in two years' time, if you are in the same place in the polls, even len mccluskey has said he would have to consider your position? we are demanding social justice in britain, that is what the
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labour party exists for, that is what ijoined for labour party exists for, that is what i joined for and labour party exists for, that is what ijoined for and that is what i will continue doing. can i ask about social care, people will have seen yesterday that he presented theresa may with the situation unfolding in surrey, suggesting the local authority is getting special treatment. what would a labour government do to improve social care? everyone knows it is in crisis right now. first of all, several billion pounds has been cut since 2010 from social care and the crisis has seeped into a crisis in the hospitals as well because it affects ca re hospitals as well because it affects care outside of hospitals, so there isa care outside of hospitals, so there is a blocking process in the hospital. that is a problem so we would ensure proper funding hospital. that is a problem so we would ensure properfunding of it and would not do sweetheart deals with surrey county council is, there has to be a fair national system. the government's line of development on this is to allow local authorities to raise council tax to pay for it, even if they all raised it by 3% it only raises the sixth of
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the money necessary but race different sums of money. you get a big sum of money in windsor, for example, a very small sum of money in knowsley, there has to be nationalfunding for in knowsley, there has to be national funding for rate. about £2 billion is needed. but the crisis in the nhs is also paid for by families, many of whom have to give up families, many of whom have to give up work to care for people who should be cared for by the social ca re you —— lord shadow chancellor was here a week ago news that if donald trump was in the uk he wouldn't meet him, what you do? my position is donald trump shouldn't come. would you meet him? i think we have to have relations with usa, i'm not sure he'd want a meeting with us. have relations with usa, i'm not sure he'd want a meeting with usm an answer to the question? would you meet him? the point is donald trump
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has been promoting something that into mine 's international law, promoting misogyny, he's been mating some awful statements in the usa and threatening to build a wall. i think we should be challenging trump on international law issues and we should be not rolling out the red carpet to him. you could do that if you met him? when he weds a candidate somebody said, would i meet him and i said i thought it would be very useful for him to come to the mosque in my constituency so he could understand something about multicultural society. i don't know if he wants to do that is. honestly... so we can end this, would you meet him?” honestly... so we can end this, would you meet him? i think it would be right to meet the president of the usa but i think it would be wrong for him to come here. thank you! thank you. i appreciate your time this morning. thank you for coming in to see us. it's 8.19am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. a mixed picture this morning. this in devon but this is in berwick—upon—tweed. more cloud around. that tells the forecast quite nicely. in the west under clear skies some lovely sunrises, but in the east there is more cloud on some wintry showers. high pressure is blocking the weather systems coming in from the atlantic and around this area of high pressure, we are dragging in cold continental air. if you haven't stepped outside yet, it is cold and for some of us frosty. watch out for some ice on untreated surfaces first thing. afair some ice on untreated surfaces first thing. a fair bit of sunshine in the west. a few showers dotted around here and there. in central and eastern areas, some cloud and the cloudier it will stay with wintry showers. into the afternoon we hang on to some lovely sunshine in the west of scotland. the gales we have in the north—west easing, snow in
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the grampians and in the southern uplands. as we come across central and eastern parts of england, a lot of cloud. 0n the coastline some wintry showers, a mix of rain and sleet. you don't have to come too far inland and that will be a mix of sun and snow. in the south—west clearer skies throughout the day. 0ne clearer skies throughout the day. one or two showers in cornwall. it will still feel cold. the same for west wales. you will hang onto some sunshine but the rest of wales, fairly cloudy. northern ireland, a lot of the showers fading but still a few rogue ones left behind and bright spells or sunshine. through this evening and overnight, where we have clear skies, the north—western half of scotland, west wales, there will be some frost and you might have to scrape yorker first thing in the morning. elsewhere, although it will be cold, some frost around but we carry on with the wintry showers, so we carry on with the wintry showers, so there could be an issue with ice first thing. into tomorrow, that's how we start, on that cold node.
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still this cold easterly wind coming in. tomorrow there will be further snow showers, the same combination is today. sleet and rain in the east on the coast, inland snow. particularly so across 0rkney and shetland, where we could have up to six centimetres, two inches. despite the temperatures you will see on your thermometers, at the window and it will fill cold. by saturday a more organised area of rain, sleet and snow coming from the ease, the wind moves to north—easterly, exacerbating the cold feel. so though showers will make it into wales, south—west england and also northern ireland. but generally speaking the north—west seeing the lion share of the sunshine. a raw feeling day on sunday. 0nce againafair a raw feeling day on sunday. 0nce again a fair bit of cloud, still this keen wind and still a wintry mix of showers. thank you. across the bbc this week we've been looking at the pressures the nhs is under. we've met rural gps working long
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hours, seen how cuts are affecting mental health provision, and investigated alternative ways to fund the service. today for our nhs health check... we follow a day in the life of kathryn carruthers, a matron at a busy emergency care unit in north london. it is chock—a—block. all those patients you can see are waiting, and there is probably more patients, more patients here, and more patients all down the corridor here. everybody is trying, but sometimes trying isn't enough, and you feel that everything is gridlocked, and that can be very frustrating. my name is kathryn carruthers. i'm the matron for ambulatory emergency care here at northwick park hospital. we're part of the emergency division. we try to see patients that need urgent care, and get treatment without the requirement for admission. a&e have already rung this morning to see if we can take some patients that have been down there
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for quite some time. we're at 100%. staffing is a huge challenge. we don't always have the number of staff that we would like. ok, so we'll go to ed. it is busy. lots of staff, and patients on trolleys, and relatives, who look fed up. they have been waiting, you can tell. good morning. i'm kathy, i'm the matron. i know you have been here for a very long time. for me, currently, this is probably the worst i have seen the nhs. when it is completely relentless, i think you do drain staff. got a real problem, actually. there is a woman who hasjust moved, and she has a bowel obstruction, and she can sit here all night in a chair. it is absolutely full,
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and nowhere to examine patients. which is not the hospital's fault, it does its absolute best. mayhem in there. sorry, do you mind if i take this call? hi, colin. two orthopaedic patients, a chap in a chair. i had to wait, and wait and wait. oh, well. looks like a movie now. you are not allergic to any medicine? it is almost the end of the day. 0ur department ticked along quite nicely. i don't think it is sustainable to continue this amount of pressure. i'm off training. i'm at an athletic club, before going home and seeing to the rest of the family. and then back to do it all again. back to do it all again tomorrow. 0ur our thanks to katherine and the
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hospital. you can find out much more about the bbc‘s nhs health check series online. including a piece by our health correspondent, nick triggle, who has analysed ten charts which show why, despite rising funding, the nhs is in trouble. ben has the other main business stories today. some figures from thomas cook. travel firm thomas cook has reported losses of £67m — and warned that it remains cautious about the rest of the year, given the uncertain political and economic outlook. the firm says bookings to greece are up by over 40%, and destinations like cyprus, portugal and croatia have also seen strong demand. that's helping make up for poor sales to turkey and egypt — as tourists are put off by recent terror attacks. waitrose says it's looking to close six stores, but open eight new ones. 500 jobs are at risk in hertford, staines, leek, huntingdon, cardiff and palmers green in london. the supermarket says it tries hard to avoid closing branches but will review how the shops
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perform and will act accordingly. the battle between our supermarkets is hotting up. body shop could be looking for a new owner. the firm, owned by l'0real, has 3,000 stores in 66 countries but sales are down sharply and losses last year grew to nearly £20m. lots of people getting in touch talking about their favourite body shop products. white mask. satsuma? shop products. white mask. satsuma ? i shop products. white mask. satsuma? i don't remember any of them. iam satsuma? i don't remember any of them. i am sure i smelt them. maybe for the ladies! thanks very much. now it is time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. it has been a cold start today and we have a classic weather pattern
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when nothing moves. a blocking area of cold air over scandinavia stopping anything coming from the atlantic, which is where we tend to get our milderair atlantic, which is where we tend to get our milder air this time of year. it will feel colder as the easterly wind picks up bringing more wintry showers. a stronger winds today, wintry showers blowing further inland, you can see the extent of the cloud, cloudy day for northern ireland where it is windy, some sunshine on the western fringes of scotland, north—west england for a while, west wales and the south—west of england perhaps but temperatures further east no than to war three degrees and it will feel colder in the wind. almost anywhere across central and
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eastern parts of the uk could see a dusting of snow overnight, the threat of some icy patches as well. the cold night whether you have got the cloud or not, breaks possible to the cloud or not, breaks possible to the west, most places will be cloudy and most places will see temperatures close to if notjust below freezing. another cold start of the day on friday, feeling colder because the wind will be stronger tomorrow as well, wintry showers, sleet and rain along the coast but inland some flurries of snow. some sunshine particularly across western scotla nd sunshine particularly across western scotland but a cold day everywhere. 0ver scotland but a cold day everywhere. over the hills it may stay below freezing all day. this is where we are more likely to get a dusting of snow. stronger winds saturday for england and wales, this is where we will see most of the showers, rain or sleet along the coast but some snow inland, brighter across scotla nd snow inland, brighter across scotland and northern ireland and we should seek some sunshine here this weekend, the wind not as strong. into sunday, more showers, mostly
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rain, not quite as cold blood flow improvement. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and ben bland. will us airlines reach new heights under president trump? their bosses land at the white house with concerns over fast—growing gulf carriers at the top of the list. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 9th february. the president who used to run his own airline but failed —
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says he wants the bosses of us carriers to "buy american and hire american", but what can he to do help them? also in the programme...

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